Monday, 5 February 2018

How you can help your child with Mathematics

Ideas to help with Maths at Home:

You can help your child's learning every day, by supporting and encouraging
them and being excited by their learning. Here are some ideas to keep them
developing their numeracy skills at home. Have a look at the year group for
your child and have fun.

Year 1:
Help your child to:
  • find numbers around your home and neighbourhood – clocks, letterboxes, speed signs
  • count forwards and backwards (clocks, fingers and toes, letterboxes, action rhymes, signs)
  • make patterns when counting "clap 1, stamp 2, clap 3, stamp 4, clap 5…"
  • do sums using objects such as stones or marbles eg 2 + 3, 4 +1, 5 + 4
  • make up number stories – "you have 2 brothers and 2 sisters. There are 4 of them"
Here's a tip - maths is an important part of everyday life and there are lots of ways you can
make it fun for your child.

Use easy, everyday activities

Involve your child in:
  • preparing and sharing out food – "two for me and two for you". Ask, "How many for
    • each of us?"
  • talking about time – "lunchtime", "storytime", "bedtime"
  • using words in everyday play like "under", "over", "between", "around", "behind", "up",
    • "down", "heavy", "light", "round", "circle", "yesterday", "tomorrow".
  • asking questions like "How many apples do we need for lunches?
  • What do you think the weather is going to be like today/tomorrow?
  • What are we going to do next?"

Here's a tip - use lots of mathematics words as your child is playing to
develop their understanding of early mathematics (eg "over", "under", "first, second,
third", "round", "through", "before", "after"). Use the language that works best
for you and your child.

For wet afternoons/school holidays/weekends

Get together with your child and:
  • play with water using different shaped containers and measuring cups in the sink or bath
  • bake – talk to your child about the recipe/ingredients using words like
  • "how many?" "how much?" "more". Count how many teaspoons of baking soda are
    • needed, how many cups of flour, how many muffin cases
  • play dress-ups and getting dressed, use words like "short", "long", and ask questions
    • like "what goes on first?", "what goes on next?", "does it fit?"
  • create a ‘sorting box’ with all sorts of ‘treasure’ – bottle tops, shells, stones, poi,
  • toys, acorns, pounamu (greenstone), cardboard shapes, leaves.
  • Ask questions like "how many?", "which is the biggest group?", "which is the smallest?",
    • "how many for each of us?"
  • do jigsaw puzzles, play card and board games and build with blocks.
Here's a tip - being positive about mathematics is really important for your child’s learning
– even if you didn’t enjoy it or do well at it yourself at school.

Year 2:

Talk together and have fun with numbers and patterns

Help your child to:
  • find and connect numbers around your home and neighbourhood; eg find 7, 17 and
    • 27 on letterboxes
  • count forwards and backwards starting with different numbers (eg 58, 59, 60, 61,
    • 62, then back again)
  • make patterns when counting forwards and backwards (eg "5, 10, 15, 20 then 20,
    • 15, 10, 5 and 30, 40, 50, 60 or 12, 14, 16, 18, …")
  • do addition and subtraction problems by counting forwards or backwards in their heads
    • (eg 8 + 4, 16 – 3)
  • count the number of poi in a kapa haka performance learn their ‘ten and...’ facts
    • (eg 10 + 4, 10 + 7) double and halve numbers to 20 (eg 7 + 7 is 14, half of 14 is 7).
Here's a tip - being positive about mathematics is really important for your child’s learning
– even if you didn’t enjoy it or do well at it yourself at school.

Use easy, everyday activities

Involve your child in:
  • sorting (washing, odd socks, toys, cans) while tidying up
  • telling you what their favourite things are – food, sport, colour reading
    • - notice and talk about numbers.
  • ask questions about the pictures like “how many birds are there?”
  • a shape and number search together wherever you are, like numbers of shoes,
    • shapes of doors and windows.
Here's a tip - mathematics is an important part of everyday life and there are lots of ways
you can make it fun for your child.

For wet afternoons/school holidays/weekends

Get together with your child and:
  • use mathematics words during play (treasure hunts, obstacle courses, building huts) -
    • "under', "over", 'between", 'around", "behind", "up", "down', "heavy", "light', 'round
            • "your turn next","before", "after", "left" and "right", "square", "triangle" ..
  • play games and do puzzles; eg jigsaws, "I spy something that is longer, bigger, smaller than..."
  • do water play using different shaped containers and measuring cups
  • bake – talk to your child about the recipe/ingredients and how many pieces you
    • need to feed everyone
  • dance to music and sing/clap to favourite songs make and play stick games with
    • tī rākau or newspaper rolls play with a pack of cards - make up addition and subtraction
      • games.
  • Encourage your child to look for patterns.
Here's a tip - the way your child is learning to solve mathematics problems may be
different from when you were at school. Get them to show you how they do it
and support them in their learning.

Year 3:
Help your child to:
  • find numbers around your home and neighbourhood – clocks, letterboxes, speed signs
  • count forwards and backwards (clocks, fingers and toes, letterboxes, action rhymes, signs)
  • make patterns when counting "clap 1, stamp 2, clap 3, stamp 4, clap 5…"
  • do sums using objects such as stones or marbles eg 2 + 3, 4 +1, 5 + 4
  • make up number stories – "you have 2 brothers and 2 sisters. There are 4 of them"
Here's a tip - maths is an important part of everyday life and there are lots of ways you can
make it fun for your child.

Use easy, everyday activities

Involve your child in:
  • preparing and sharing out food – "two for me and two for you". Ask, "How many for each of us?"
  • talking about time – "lunchtime", "storytime", "bedtime"
  • using words in everyday play like "under", "over", "between", "around", "behind", "up",
    • "down", "heavy", "light", "round", "circle", "yesterday", "tomorrow". You can get library
  • asking questions like "How many apples do we need for lunches? What do you think the
    • weather is going to be like today/tomorrow? What are we going to do next?"
Here's a tip - use lots of mathematics words as your child is playing to develop their
understanding of early mathematics (eg "over", "under", "first, second, third", "round",
"through", "before", "after"). Use the language that works best for you and your child.

For wet afternoons/school holidays/weekends

Get together with your child and:
  • play with water using different shaped containers and measuring cups in the sink or bath
  • bake – talk to your child about the recipe/ingredients using words like "how many?"
    • "how much?" "more". Count how many teaspoons of baking soda are needed,
      • how many cups of flour in a muffin recipe.
  • play dress-ups and getting dressed, use words like "short", "long", and ask questions
    • like "what goes on first?", "what goes on next?", "does it fit?"
  • create a ‘sorting box’ with all sorts of ‘treasure’ – bottle tops, shells, stones, poi, toys,
    • acorns, pounamu (greenstone), cardboard shapes, leaves.

  • do jigsaw puzzles, play card and board games and build with blocks.
Here's a tip - being positive about mathematics is really important for your child’s learning
– even if you didn’t enjoy it or do well at it yourself at school.

Year 4:

Help your child to:
  • find and connect numbers around your home and neighbourhood – phone numbers,
    • clocks, letterboxes, road signs, signs showing distance
  • count forwards and backwards (starting with numbers like 998, 999, 1,000, 1,001,
    • 1,002 then back again)
  • make patterns when counting – forwards and backwards, starting with different
    • numbers (73, 83, 93, 103… or 118, 108, 98, 88…)
  • explore patterns through drumming, clapping, stamping, dancing find out the ages
    • and birth dates of family and whānau see patterns in the numbers in their times tables.
Here's a tip - being positive about mathematics is really important for your child’s learning
– even if you didn’t enjoy it or do well at it yourself at school.

Use easy, everyday activities

Involve your child in:
  • making lunch or a meal for a party or a hui – make sandwiches in different shapes.
    • Can they cut their sandwich in half? Can they cut the other sandwich in half a different way
  • helping at the supermarket – choose items to weigh – how many apples/banana
    • weigh a kilo? Look for the best buy between different makes of the same items
          • (eg blocks of cheese) – check on the amount of sugar or salt per serving
  • telling the time – o’clock, ½ , ¼ past
  • deciding how much money you will need to put into the parking meter and
    • what time you will need to be back before the meter expires
  • thinking about how many telephone numbers they can remember
    • – talk about what they do to help them remember the series of numbers
  • reading together – help them look for numbers and mathematics ideas
  • looking for shapes and numbers in newspapers, magazines, junk mail, art
    • (like carvings and sculpture).
Here's a tip - mathematics is an important part of everyday life and there are lots of
ways you can make it fun for your child.

For wet afternoons/school holidays/weekends

Get together with your child and:
  • play card and board games that use guessing and checking
  • look at junk mail – which is the best value? Ask your child what they would buy if
    • they had $10/$100/$1,000 to spend
  • do complicated jigsaw puzzles
  • cook or bake – use measuring cups, spoons (½ and ¼ teaspoon) and scales
  • collect boxes – undo and see if you can make them up again or make it into something else
  • make paper darts and change the weight so that they fly differently, work out which is
    • the best design
  • create a repeating pattern (eg kōwhaiwhai patterns) to fill up a page or decorate a card
  • play mathematics "I Spy" – something that is ½ a km away, something that has
    • 5 parts hide something from each other and draw a map or hide several clues
  • do skipping ropes/elastics – how long will it take to jump 20 times?
Here's a tip - the way your child is learning to solve mathematics problems may
be different to when you were at school. Get them to show you how they do it
and support them in their learning.

Year 5:

Talk together and have fun with numbers and patterns

Help your child to:
  • count forwards and backwards (starting with numbers like 10,098, 10,099, 10,100,
    • 10,101 then back again)
  • find and read large numbers in your environment eg nineteen thousand,
    • three hundred and twenty-three
  • learn number pairs to 100 eg 81 and what equals 100?
  • read car number plates, look at the car’s odometer to see how far you’ve gone
  • work out patterns – make codes from numbers.
Here's a tip - being positive about mathematics is really important for your child’s learning
– even if you didn’t enjoy it or do well at it yourself at school.

Use easy, everyday activities

Involve your child in:
  • making and organising lunch or a meal for a party or a hui, including equal sharing
    • of fruit/biscuits/sandwiches/drinks
  • helping at the supermarket – choose items to weigh. Look for the best buy between
    • different brands of the same items (breakfast cereal, spreads like jam or honey)
  • practising times tables – check with your child or their teacher which times tables
    • you could help your child with
  • telling the time e.g., 5 past, 10 past, 20 past, ¼ to, 25 to...
Here's a tip - mathematics is an important part of everyday life and there are lots of
ways you can make it fun for your child.

For wet afternoon/school holidays/weekends

Get together with your child and:
  • play card and board games that use guessing and checking
  • do complicated jigsaw puzzles
  • look through junk mail – find the most expensive and cheapest item advertised or make
    • into strips to make a woven mat
  • make a roster for jobs around the house
  • plan for a special event on a budget; eg afternoon tea for a grandparent, teacher or
    • family friend
  • play outside games – cricket, basketball, mini-golf and soccer
  • bake – follow a simple recipe (scones, pikelets)
  • use blocks that fit together to make a model. Draw what it looks like from each side
    • and above. Then draw what they think it looks like from underneath.
  • make water balloons and see how far you could throw them (outside!!)
    • and how far the water splatters
  • collect the family and whānau birthdays and put in order
    • – make a reminder calendar for the year.
Here's a tip - the way your child is learning to solve mathematics problems may be
different to when you were at school. Get them to show you how they do it and support
them in their learning.

Year 6:

Talk together and have fun with numbers and patterns

Help your child:
  • count forwards and backwards (starting with numbers like these fractions: ¼ , ½ ,
    • ¾ , 1, 1¼ , 1½ then back again)
  • talk about large numbers in your environment e.g., computer game scores, distances
  • talk about the phases of the moon and link these to the best times for fishing/planting
  • talk about the patterns in the night sky – summer and winter. What changes and why?
  • talk about graphs and tables that are in your local newspapers.
Here's a tip - being positive about maths is really important for your child’s learning
– even if you didn’t enjoy it or do well at it yourself at school.

Use easy, everyday activities

Involve your child in:
  • making dinner at home, at camp or on a marae – look at how many and how much
    • is needed for the people eating (potatoes, bok choy, carrots, sausages).
        • Talk about fractions (half, quarter, fourth) to calculate how much to cook
  • helping at the supermarket – look for the best buy between different brands
  • of the same item and different sizes of the same item (e.g., toilet paper,
    • cans of spaghetti, bottles of milk)
  • looking at the nutrition table on food labels – how much fat, sugar, salt -
    • and deciding on the healthiest choice
  • practising times tables – check with your child or their teacher which tables you could
    • help them with.

For wet afternoons/school holidays/weekends

Get together with your child and:
  • play card and board games using guessing and checking
  • cook – make a pizza, working out who likes what toppings, making and cooking it, and making sure the pizza is shared fairly – make a paper or cardboard container to hold a piece of pizza to take for lunch
  • mix a drink for the family – measuring cordial, fruit and water
  • make kites or manu aute using a variety of shapes and materials. How high can it go, how long can it fly for?
  • make a family/whānau tree or whakapapa – number of cousins, aunts and uncles, grandparents and their relationships to you
  • plan out the holidays. Look at each day’s fun time, kai time, TV time, helping time, family time and bedtime
  • plan to make bead necklaces and friendship bracelets – calculate the cost of the materials, the length of stringing material
  • play outdoor games – frisbee, touch rugby, kilikiti, cricket, soccer, bowls
  • do complicated jigsaw puzzles
  • go on scavenger hunts – make a map with clues and see who can get there first.
Here's some tips -
mathematics is an important part of everyday life and there are lots of ways you can make it fun for your child.
The way your child is learning to solve mathematics problems may be different to when you were at school. Get them to show you how they do it and support them in their learning.